Her family had moved at this time into the Hampshire countryside, firstly to Meonstoke and then to Soberton Towers, where the rooms were large and for the first time she had her own studio; in addition, she could walk out into the countryside from her front door.


Untitled, by Jill Bray

Through her fellow students at Southampton, it was decided that it was necessary to keep the group together. This began as a social thing and with the desire to exhibit together. This group was the foundation of 2d3d South, with whom Jill still shows.


Untitled, by Jill Bray

Jill has had work bought for many collections, including Hampshire County Council and Southampton University, and the list of her exhibitions is too long to include. Major shows in which she has been included have been a touring show in Rekyavik, Duisberg, Amsterdam, Aarhus, Bratislava and Moscow, The Royal Festival Hall, The West of England Academy, The Barbican Centre, Bankside Gallery, Bedales gallery and many other local galleries.

The triptych below, from 2012, won First prize at the Portsmouth Open. The work concerns the excavation of the bodies of three Saxon soldiers complete with their swords found during the construction of the M3 cutting at Hockley.


Untitled, by Jill Bray

She also has work in many private collections, and is a member of the Printmakers Council.

After moving to Fareham, she inherited a powered press from a friend; this has enabled Jill to print at home for the past fifteen years. Lately her work has changed to include collage as well as pure print. The main styles of print for which she has become well known are mono prints and carborundum prints. As with many other artists, Jill favours a limited colour palette, and the colours red and black are the trademarks of her process.


Untitled, by Jill Bray

Jill says, “ I have never climbed a mountain, but they have always intrigued me. Seeing them from a distance, the paths and the cliff edges, and the archaeology of ancient sites in Southern England mirror the traces of land usage”.


Untitled, by Jill Bray